Dating rules different cultures

Once we started dating, though, things changed fast. First off, while his English is quite good (his first language is Arabic), I’m an English Major- so some of the words we said to each other were taken with a different meaning, leading to some major communication issues.

Sure, they will go out for dinner and do fun activities, but it’s not packaged up in a formal and contrived manner. It’s more organic and instead of defining the relationship in order to know how to act, they let the relationship unfold and the label of boyfriend/girlfriend just naturally develops in the process. European men are comfortable with women, which leads to respect for women.

Perhaps this has to do with their upbringing, where it’s very normal for boys and girls to play and intermingle together.

I’m not to judge that one is better than the other, and mind you, my observations are based on my own experiences as well as a group of women I’ve interviewed in the last two years.

The below is a list of some of the themes and commonalities observed.

I can best describe it as courting with initial ambiguity.

Things also move much more slowly than in the west.

Among Japanese teenagers the most basic way of starting to date someone is by giving them a “kokuhaku” or love confession.

This sounds a bit creepy but it’s not so much telling someone you love them but rather the Japanese way of letting them know you like them and asking them out.

They also stemmed from superstitions that would frustrate me- like having to wear slippers in the washroom or not holding a knife at night time.

I was also not okay with the idea of arrange marriages, oppressive gender roles, and not being able to meet his parents.

When I first moved America to attend college, I was nervous about starting a life in a new country because I wasn’t sure how quickly I would be able to adapt to the new culture.

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